Agriculture and Economics

This page will contain interesting information about the food economy with a focus on local and international agriculture and food systems.
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NewWe are moving into an era when people want less assortment.””
This article is about a recent trend of supermarket chains experimenting with smaller stores. Hopefully this will address the issue of supermarket waste.
Full article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/10/business/10grocery.html?pagewanted=2&em

Food prices are causing misery and strife around the world. Radical solutions are needed— The Silent Tsunami”

This article featured in the Economist challenges the traditional notion of what a real famine is like. This goes away from pictures of swollen babies and people starved to the bones. Instead the article shows how famine is not always caused by the lack of food, but by the inability to buy food on the shelves. The article goes on further to detail the causes and some radical solutions necessary to stop the price distortion.

Full article here: http://www.economist.com/opinion/displaystory.cfm?story_id=11050146

“Most Americans take food for granted. Even the poorest fifth of households in the United States spend only 16 percent of their budget on food.”

This article goes further into the current food crisis. It talks briefly about the uncontrollable factors (such as the rise of the middle class in China and India—which means increase in the demand) and controllable factors (ethanol production and grain subsidies) that has been leading up to the food crisis.

Full article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/10/opinion/10thu1.html

“Advocacy for policies good enough to protect pets also means advocacy for policies that protect people.”

This article is a book review of Pet Food Politics. It goes deeper to say that the relatively recent pet food crisis should prompt closwer examination into our own food system.

Full article here: http://www.economist.com/books/displaystory.cfm?story_id=12051443

““It’s salty and it has butter and you don’t know you’re eating dirt,”

This article goes into the current food crisis into a more cultural level doing a brief survey on a few countries. Each government is handling the situation differently, while some ignore at their own risk.

Full article: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/18/world/americas/18food.html?pagewanted=2

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